Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 4
MSNBCW 3
MSNBC 2
WBFF (FOX) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
important may be at this moment, the state of florida already 41% of precincts reporting because they do so automatically, and largely because -- there are two times in florida. the eastern time, we all know this from the 2000 election, the eastern time zone has been closed for an hour. the panhandle, which means fort walton beach, panama city, pensacola, all the counties around the panhandle had just closed, so their numbers are not yet in. the old saying about florida is the for the north you go, the father southern you get, which means the panhandle is republican territory. the southeast part of the status democratic territory. what decides florida is the interstate corridor that stretches from tampa to orlando and all the way to daytona beach and some small communities in between. that area there will decide florida. that area is in. the panhandle is just coming in. let's look at florida again. it is lopsided at the moment. you can see or you will be able to see in a moment that in a state of florida with 41% of precincts reported, there is a lopsided lead at the moment for barack obama
.m. or future days. the romney campaign is watching closely florida, virginia and ohio. there are very few victory strategies contemplated by boston, the romney campaign, that don't include the buckeye state and they're concerned about signs of high turn-out in the northern part of ohio where the detroit auto bail-out was a big mallet which the president pounded mr. romney. on the southern border of ohio along kentucky, particularly along cincinnati, hamilton county, big optimism and turn-out for the republican campaign. virginia, florida, ohio romney believes so go though so goes the country. romney has only written one speech, a victory speech. >> carl cameron. let's get straight to the president's camp in chicago and ed henry. >> shep, the president has been getting very wistful. it started in iowa what started the obama movement. he said today he was crying partly because it was cold out and thinking back four years ago and thinking about everyone turning out for him last night. he is hoping for big turn-outs in big battlegrounds. i got off the phone with one of the president's senior
, not only virginia but also florida in the southeast to be competitive in this race tonight, but that is not enough. as we move to the midwest he's going to have po pick off one of the key states in barack obama's fire wall, either ohio or wisconsin because you see what happens right there, if the president gets both ohio and wisconsin he only five votes away from an electoral lock. >> well, this is the difficult route that br has. he has to take the atlantic coasts sta s states and move i into the midwest and start picking off midwestern states. early in the night if he sees trouble in those, it's going to be a very difficult night for mitt romney. he has to win those three atlantic coast states. >> if he doesn't, if the president wins any one if we go back to the what if board in the middle. any one of these in play where he's ahead or tied he has 270 electoral votes. >> let's head off to richmond, virginia, with amy klobuchar robach. i know you're at a dnc headquarters. >> reporter: i'm wearing purple. it was completely coincidental but very appropriate because this is a
. >> appreciate all the work you are doing. >> then back to boston to await returns with often eye on florida, ohio and virginia, team romney expects as they go, so will the nation. for months despite record spending, record campaign activity, record advertising, neither candidate really been able to break away from the other. tonight in boston there is optimism. hope, anxiousness. preparation for what could be a very late night that could spill in tomorrow or beyond. megyn, bret? >> thank you. >> bret: now to chief white house correspondent ed henry in chicago. sned >> good evening, bret. last night, the obama camp was predicting a blow-out. we got off the phone with the senior advisors saying they have to admit florida, virginia, and slew of battlegrounds are too close to call. >> president obama tried to displace calm and confidence today -- >> i expect we will have a good night. >> it was clear last night the magnitude of the moment set in. as he waits to find out whether he will secure his place in history as a transformational president or mere one-term wonder. >> he said yes, we can. a
in the battle ground state of florida, but not before many counties saw a record, gigantic lines. and phil keating joins us from tampa, and the numbers. it was crazy yesterday, phil. >> absolutely, reportedly six hour waits at certain locations in miami-dade county outside of the precinct on friday, three and a half hours all day long to stand in line, shuffle forward and finally cost their ballot. the numbers are big despite the fact in 2008 there was early voting on this sunday before election day, this year, there is not. and that's been a point of convention, democrats and democrat leaning groups have called that voting suppression engineered by the republican dominated legislature and governor's office in the state of florida. however, despite those cries, the numbers have been as good as they were back in 2008. take a look at numbers right now. nearly 4 million, this is through friday, nearly 4 million floridians voted early, by early voting or absentee ballot. and the way it breaks down, the most early voters stand in line and cast their ballot, 45% of those people are registered de
we think we will be officially the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we planned for, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same percent of the electorate as in 2008. we got 65% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, voting rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battleground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 1996. in florida increase from 14% in 2008 to 17% in 2012. we increased our vote share in florida
: you covered jeb bush in florida. >> he has been a leading mathematician. he said the republican party needs to embrace immigration reform, not just for political reasons but for economic reasons. there is common ground when it comes to immigration on the one aspect of immigration reform that deals with high skilled workers. we need to make sure the brightest who come here to get educated are staying here. because of the other issues involving immigration, border security, folks not highly skilled, that muddies the water. perhaps this election will be the frying pan on the head of the republican party. >> there was talk about romney's change in tone. talk about this message versus substance debate they will probably have to have. should they just be nicer to hispanics? >> the public is more informed than it ever has been because of the internet. we are not getting the job done here in washington. the same is true for the democrats. i was struck by the president's speech. he's never followed up on the 2008 speech. he was not able to fill those lofty promises. he was very powerful. humil
for president obama. in the wake of the last florida voting debacle we had resolved to make things better. in 2002 congress passed the help america vote act which allocated almost $4 billion to states to help them make sweeping reforms to the voting process, yet reports from tuesday night don't inspire much confidence that things have been fixed. in fact, there's a good case to make that republicans have gone about breaking it on purpose. according to the aflcia voters say 16% of obama voters waited versus 9% of romney voters. this is a system in which election officials are simply overwhelmed. there's too many stories of lack of informed workers and polling machines. if we're supposed to measure the fitness of our democracy system by the way the voting went, then we are grossly out of shape. current senior pastor of the first baptist church of lincoln garden in somerset, new jersey. nina perez. she's at nyu school of law. ben gellis is president of the naacp. bertha lewis. great to have you all here. >> great to be here. >> i interviewed you, i was doing a story about election administra
there's including american airlines, target and florida blew them are very grateful to them as well. we have a very special new program for you. i hope you will stay with for the tire afternoon, but of course they are our many author sessions throughout this fair that you should partake in, as time and enjoy. your cell phones if you'd please turn those off as a standard as you all know so we have no interruption in the author will be autographing books as always in the green area to the right of the elevator. to introduce our author today, i'm sure you will all be delighted to have the individual who is a founder of miami book fair in your national. let me see if you can guess who this individual is as they move along. one of the founders of miami book fair international, the owner of books and books. i think i gave it away right there. and certainly someone in this community who has propelled the move went of book selling them publishing and all that encompasses literary work. please look on mr. mitchell castle to the podium. [applause] >> thank you, mary lou. thank you all for making
reelection with 303 electoral votes with florida's 29 still undetermined and over 50% of the popular vote. the national journal hosted several panel discussions breaking down the road to results and looking at the implications for national politics and the congressional agenda. >> it turned out not to be as long night as people expected and we're going to talk about that today and why and look forward to how the president to make go forward from this victory which think is safe to say it was quicker and bigger than many people expected. would you like to tell us how this happened and -- why this happened and how? >> it was bigger than we expected. he really swept the battleground states. the only states that he lost that he had won in 2008, was north carolina which he had won by 14,000 votes in 2008. it was considered a fluke. what that tells us is that the set of assumptions that the obama campaign was operating on was correct. and a set of assumptions that the romney campaign was operating on was not. it's sort of make sense in a way sense obama's theory about the campaign turned out to
different things. get on the same page. host: let's hear from susan brita, florida. -- susan in tampa. caller: mitt romney is an honorable man. in the winter, in the spring, when the other side was thinking there talons into the democrats, romney was doing his best to get his party's nomination, so he never got his feet off the ground until june. so he is bitter. that is a natural human emotion that we all feel. it was such a devastating loss. i am hearing from republicans all over the country. they are depressed, distraught, heartsick. everybody has that feeling. mitt romney was a candidate for everyone. he did not single out the groups. he just wanted everybody to believe in america. i keep thinking about the story he told the crowd about cutting the flag that was on the shuttle in 1986 and i could see the electricity going through him. he loves america and wants us to love america too. host: to facebook -- twitter -- back to your calls, republicans on 00 only, on the future of your party. mark in arlington, virginia. caller: i think tim pawlenty is absolutely right. i would have vo
record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous conflict of interest. he is getting all of these people's money, spending it for mitt romney, then he is on fox news as a supposedly independent political commentator and is writing a column for "the wall street journal." there are so many conflicts there is a pleasure mind. host: and on the lecture circuit. guest: which, by the way, i am on that too. he has all kinds of things. his losing record is what points out that his time in american politics has come and gone. host: what is next for the political parties and the president? our guest is bill press. he concludes with these words -- there is a boundary to what luster a
. in florida, percentage of hispanic voters went up to 70% from 14% 2008, and the composition of the hispanic vote changed and has grown very different than what it was just a few years ago with many more puerto ricans making up the share of this hispanic vote in florida. what that meant nationally was that despite all predictions, democrats were able to keep their edge in the overall electorate. a shock to many people that overall partisan composition of the electorate looked so similar to 2008 with democrats holding a six-point edge. the other big demographics story of tuesday's election of course was women. i mean, we had, our first goal after the first debate when romney did so well and obama did so poorly showed the gender gap almost closing entirely. i mean, it had to be a shock for a lot of democrats to look at that poll. there were other polls that showed the same thing. romney really made gains among women after that first debate, in party was seen as a little bit more moderate. the issues that came up i in the debate were not necessarily, very few social issues if you recall coming
to have a better quality of life. >> then we have senator marco rubio of florida who offered a carefully worded reaction to romney, telling "politico," quote, i don't want to rebut him point by point. i would just say to you, i don't believe that we have millions and millions of people in this country that don't want to work. okay. and former mississippi governor, haley bar rour barbour, saying party needs to do some soul searching. >> we've got to give our political organizational activity, you know, a very serious proctology exam. we need to look everywhere is my point. >> yeah. you know what? i will say -- and i don't hand you compliments often -- but you've been saying this during the primary process, it started. and now it seems to me that it's great to hear these gentlemen coming forward and speaking truth to what mitt romney said. but it's just too easy right now. it should have been done in the primary process. >> it's just like when i was talking about people in the conservative entertainment complex talking in ways that we'll never win the suburbs of philadelphia, bucks county,
, florida, where they have the republican convention, to charlotte where democrats had their convention, fort bragg, back to charlotte, washington. that's 26 cds. [laughter] but i have this image of lyndon johnson spinning in his grave at the idea that there is a president of the united states that has minimal interaction with congress. and particularly someone of his own party. and when you, let's just forget republicans and let's forget tea party people. forget them. just in his own party, wander around the hill as all of you to around all the time and ask members of the democratic at how much personal interaction you have with the president. and i have, you know, i hate giving political credit for anything, but they had that piece back in may. just pointed out that the president, as of may when that article was written, had not had a single conversation this year with this year weedeater kent conrad, chairman of the senate budget committee, or tom harkin, the chairman of the senate health education labor binge committee. phone or in person this year. now, you can talk about tea party
and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that something was got to hold in the farm bill and that's another reason i want to get it to conference by the end of the year. >> i do hope that the farm bill comes to four, this bill, i hope it's an open robe that the amendments, process can take place to i would anticipate conservatives bring an amendment to split the component from the agriculture component that i don't get the votes for it but once and for all let's at least start to have this debate. severing of foodstamp provision of all the ag policies. since i'm surrounded by kansas, iowa, north dakota, would you gentlemen like to speak as will? >> well, speaking as one who campaigned very strongly in support in, strong support of the proposed bill without apology, i can tell you that the farmers of north dakota like the house bill just fine. not only
. florida is right behind them. >> when you see notre dame/alabama, i think back to '73, sugar bowl. >> is this going to be the same thing. >> another classic bowl game because you just assume alabama will blow them out. >> notre dame still national championships in '73, '74, '77. i don't know an alabama fan alive then that doesn't want that match-up and take the frustration 30 1/years out. let's talk about the games quickly saturday night. holy cow. k state, what happened to k state in the hands of baylor and waco was unbelievable. they dismembered them. and then, of course, stanford, as mark said, so cool under pressure. oregon, a crazy stadium. >> it shows you how much the pressure mounts on the teams on the top. as you get deeper and deeper into the season and you foale what you're working for is right there but we have to just not screw up this week or next week. you can just sense it, here it comes. it gives the opposing team extra motivation to be that team that can knock off one of the top teams in the country. >> mike, who is the best team in the nfl right now? >> i would s
on to wanda in florida. hi, wanda. caller: i have a question for you. i paid into social security. i now get social security benefits. every month i have premiums coming out of my check. how can you consider them as socialist programs. we paid into them. host: stay on the line. guest: i also get social security and i pay my medicare premiums. i'm in the same boat she is. the benefits that are being paid a much greater than the amount repaid in. -- then the amount we pay again . they're not actuarially sound. we have to look at it to see to have these programs solvent for the next 20, 30, 40 years and for my children that will be on social security and medicare 20 years from now. in terms of some of the other programs, it depends on what you're talking about. is it socialism to support cancer research or to build roads and bridges all over our country? i don't think so. is it socialism to help people when they are hurting because of terrible unemployment? i do not think so. i think we have a responsibility to be fiscally prudent. host: do you have a response? caller: it may be. how are you go
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)